Question: How would you get the pipe if it broke?
Name:
Krysten
School:
A&M Consolidated Middle School, College Station TX
Response: Krysten, specific "fishing" tools are used to try to retrieve the pipe. One type of tool is used to try to latch onto a connection on the pipe and pull it out that way. If that doesn't work, another type of tool has a hook that we can use to drag the pipe back up.


Question: How old is the oldest fossil that you have found on this trip?
Name:
Jacqueline
School: A&M Consolidated Middle School, College Station TX
Response: Jacqueline, One of the paleontologists told me she thinks she has identified at least one from the Eocene which is 35 million years ago. There are a number that are from now to 25 million years old. We have rocks that are 60 million years old. Go to Web Geologic Time Machine to find out what else was happening on Earth during these time periods!


Question: Do you guy's go fishing and what kind of fish do all of you see in the ocean?
Name:
Cindy
School: Marlin Middle School, Marlin TX
Response: People typically not allowed to fish off the JOIDES Resolution because the lines in the ocean could get tangled in the thrusters. This could cause alot of damage, so


Question: Are there lots of injuries on the ship and if so are they seriously injured?
Name:
Maria
School: Marlin Middle School, Marlin TX
Response: The JOIDES Resolution works hard to keep people in the safest working environments. People wear safety equipment whenever necessary and and take precautions to work in ways that protect both themselves and anyone else working in the area. There is a doctor on board the ship to care for the health of everyone on board. Unfortunately, though, sometimes accidents still occur. The record of injuries aboard the JOIDES Resolution has been very good, with no work-stopping incidents occurring in more than 525 days. Crew and staff aboard the ship are given thorough physicals before they sail, to make sure that they are in very good condition. Medical problems are often unpredictable, and may require more medical attention than is available on the ship. In this case, if the ship is close to shore, a helicopter might be sent to the ship to fly the patient back to a hospital. If the ship is not close enough to shore, the ship will sail either into port or into the range of a helicopter or other method of transportation.


Question: Has the drill pipe string ever snapped while you were drilling and what would happen if it did?
Name:
Daniel
School: A&M Consolidated Middle School, College Station TX
Response: Daniel - yes, it has come apart, pulled apart, become stuck, and recoiled at various times, not necessarily on this leg. If it comes apart, they pull up and replace it. If it recoils, it can do a lot of damage. Recently, it was stuck in the hole and explosives had to be used to get it loose. One time they lost 4 kilometers of pipe in the ocean because of failure. Sometimes, the pipe pulls apart because of corrosion.


Question: What are the job requirements for one of the researchers or how do they get the job and how much do they get paid?
Name:
Becky
School: A&M Consolidated Middle School, College Station TX
Response: Science party participants are typically Ph.D. scientists or students, with a background in a field compatible with the mission of the cruise. Each scientist is nominated by their country for participation, and must agree to commit two months of time for the cruise and one year after the cruise to work on the samples or data. The co-chiefs and science operator then meet to select a balanced science party based on expertise and experience, as well as providing opportunities for young scientists to gain valuable learning experiences. Scientists are typically employed and paid by individual universities at a level related to their experience.


Question: Could you name some other fossils that are found in this area?
Name:
Dean
School: A&M Consolidated Middle School, College Station TX
Response: Dean, Fossils other than the foraminifera and nannofossils found here are: red algae, snails, clams, coral, and bryozoans. Click on the links to find out more about all these creatures!


Question: What is Mrs. Linsley's day like? What do you do when you're not taping and working on the lessons?
Name:
Shea
School: A&M Consolidated Middle School, College Station TX
Response: Shea, my day really is night! My shift is from 6:00 P.M. to 6:00 A.M. I actually started a little early today because it was raining outside so I did not spend much time outside before my shift started. Your fellow students sent me a number of questions I needed to research. Fortunately, my sources are primary--the people involved so I started my rounds to the various individuals. I have now spent about four hours just doing that research and it is not yet complete. In addition, I am video taping various activities, rooms, and labs on the ship so that takes additional time. I rehearse my broadcasts in order to determine timing and then I may have to rewrite the script because of time constraints. All the scientists have to participate in preparing samples for the group. I sometimes help them do this and I have prepared slides for X-ray. There always is something to do. As far as my time when I am off shift, I sleep, read, watch the work going on, go to the gym or walk on the helicopter deck. It seems as if I require considerably more sleep here than I do at home so I find myself with less free time than I had anticipated. Then, something may interrupt sleep time. Yesterday, for instance, one of the engineers who has been on the ship since early November testing some equipment was leaving to return home. A small, 60-foot boat came out from the mainland to get him as well as bring us some supplies. I wanted to watch that so I stayed up in the morning to watch the transfer, which always is interesting. Then, at 1:00 there was an abandon-ship drill. So, things like that can interrupt the day. The scientists are all working on reports which they have to do along with their study of the cores. Everyone keeps quite busy.


Question: What is the impact on the environment from the drilling that the ship does?
Name:
Jorge
School: A&M Consolidated Middle School, College Station TX
Response: Good question, Jorge! The impact on the environment is very little, and associated with dilling a hole in the seafloor. We use sea water for circulation and special care is used to avoid drilling in any areas that contain hydrocarbons in order to minimize the possibility of any leakage. If there were any impact, we would not have had the support of the Australians to drill in this area.


Question: What type of food do you eat and do the plates and silverware move around when the weather is bad?
Name:
Lara
School: A&M Consolidated Middle School, College Station TX
Response: Meals are served four times a day, 11 to 1:00 at night and during the day and 5:00 to 7:00 A.M. and P.M. Keep in mind that people are on different shifts. Some are from midnight to noon, noon to midnight, six to six day or night, and a three to three shift. Therefore, at every meal there may be someone eating breakfast, lunch or dinner so there are always three hot entrees such as meat, fish, and pasta plus vegetables, rice, potatoes, and soup. Then, we may serve ourselves cold vegetables for a salad such as lettuce, cabbage, carrots, tomatoes, etc. Usually, there is fresh fruit such as oranges, apples, and now bananas as well as canned fruit. If you are eating breakfast, you can order eggs, pancakes, French toast along with bacon and sausage. There are various types of cereal available along with milk and juice. We did not have lettuce for several days until the boat came in so now we have lettuce again. The entrees today, for instance, were broiled snapper, pork chops, and pasta. There is a soft ice cream machine with ice cream available most of the time as well as various puddings, cakes, and pie for desert. Also, there are cold meats, cheese, and bread always available. Cookies are served in between meals for breaks. So far, it has not been rough enough for the dishes and silverware to move on the table. It is fairly heavy so it does not move easily. My computer mouse is the only thing that seems to run in the seas we have had. I reach for it and it has crawled a foot or so away.


Question: What are the quarters like for the people working on the ship?
Name:
Matt
School: A&M Consolidated Middle School, College Station TX
Response: Matt, the cabins are all either two or four-person cabins. I am in a two-person one. My cabin mate works the six to six day shift so I seldom see her. We share a bath with the cabin next to us, but we have a sink in the cabin. We have bunk beds which are quite comfortable. The room is about ten' by twelve' and includes the set of bunk beds, two lockers, a desk, a chair, the sink, and some shelves on the wall (Take a look at this picture of one scientist's cabin). Each of the bunks has curtains so you have your own little cave in which to sleep. Since you are not in your room other than to sleep, they are quite adequate.


Question: What do the people working on the ship do in their free time and how long do they work each day?
Name:
Danielle
School: A&M Consolidated Middle School, College Station TX
Response: Danielle, everyone works a twelve-hour shift, seven days a week. Twelve hours on, and twelve hours off. On their off time, people must find time to sleep; then, they may read, exercise, sun, watch movies, just relax, or play computer games.


Question: What happened to the man's hand that had to go to the hospital last week?
Name:
Garret
School: Jefferson Jr. High, Jefferson TX
Response: Garret, that was a young woman. She had form of tendonitis in her elbow and simply had a difficult and painful time using her arm, which she had to do in her job. She did not go to the hospital in Australia; she went home for medical treatment. She should be fine once the problem is alleviated.


Question: Is the ship in the same location as the first broadcast or have you been moving around?
Name:
Amanda
School: Jefferson Jr. High, Jefferson TX
Response: Amanda, I have given some updates as to the location of the ship as we move from one site to another, but I fear I have not given all of them. You can see the coordinates by clicking on this link. We definitely have not been in the same location although we did return to one.


Question: From fossil samples, What are some of the ages of the core samples you have retrieved?
Name:
Shebrell
School: Jefferson Jr. High, Jefferson TX
Response: Shebrell, most of them have been from the present time to 25 million years of age. However, one of the paleontologists believes she has found one that is about 35 million years old. We have rocks that are 60 million years old. Take a look at the Web Geologic Time Machine to find out about some other things that were happening during these times!


Question: How much does a drill bit cost and what is it made out of?
Name:
Devon
School: Carrizo Springs Junior High, Carrizo TX
Response: The drill bit we are using right now costs about $8000.00 each. It is made of steel with inserts of tungsten carbide. We have others that range from $3000.00 to $26,000.00 for the diamond bit.


Question: How long does it take to pull the drillpipe when you replace the drillbit?
Name:
Cory
School: Jefferson Jr. High, Jefferson TX
Response: Cory, It depends upon the depth of the water. Where we are right now it takes about two hours, but when we are in 6 kilometers of water, it takes twelve hours.


Question: How was Mrs. Linsley chosen for this project?
Name:
Rachael
School: A&M Consolidated Middle School, College Station TX
Response: I was chosen for this project based on my background, my communication skills, and my enthusiasm for this project. My background has included several years of middle school teaching with experience both in and out of the classroom setting. My excitement about the science going on here has given me a great opportunity to share it with you.